• Welcome to The Worlds of Katherine Kurtz.
 

Recent

Welcome to The Worlds of Katherine Kurtz. Please login.

February 27, 2024, 09:05:47 PM

Login with username, password and session length
Members
Stats
  • Total Posts: 27,427
  • Total Topics: 2,715
  • Online today: 56
  • Online ever: 930
  • (January 20, 2020, 11:58:07 AM)
Users Online
Users: 1
Guests: 20
Total: 21

Latest Shout

*

Bynw

February 17, 2024, 02:59:38 PM
Don't forget that we have the feature of @mention available. Just use @username like @bynw in posts and the member will be tagged and get a notification that they have been tagged in a post

Turkey Breast in a Pressure Cooker.

Started by Elkhound, December 25, 2014, 09:13:42 AM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Elkhound

Take a lemon.  Stud it with cloves and shove a cinnamon stick through.  Set aside.

Chop up an onion, a couple of peppers, a couple of sticks of celery, and some garlic.

Heat some olive oil in the bottom of the cooker.  Stir-fry the onion, peppers, celery, and garlic until soft.

Put the breast in, cavity up.  In the cavity put the lemon and whatever other seasonings you want, together with a stick of butter.

Pour a bottle of dry white wine over.

Seal down lid and bring it to full pressure.  Lower heat and let process for about 50 minutes.

Take off heat and use quick-release method.  Discard lemon.  Remove breast and place on platter.  Set aside.

If you have an immersion blender, use it to puree the onion etc.; if you don't, pour remaining contents into a blender and puree, then return to cooker.  Raise heat to boiling.

Place half a cup water or milk and two tablespoons of flour, cornstarch, or tapioca powder in a screw-top jar.  Screw on lid and shake.  Open lid and pour contents into boiling pot.  Stir vigorously until mixture thickens, then cut off heat.

Slice breast and serve with gravy and sides.

DesertRose

That sounds yummy!  I'd totally try it if I owned a pressure cooker.  :)
"If having a soul means being able to feel love, loyalty, and gratitude, then animals are better off than a lot of humans."

James Herriot (James Alfred "Alfie" Wight), when a human client asked him if animals have souls.  (I don't remember in which book the story originally appeared.)

Elkhound

#2
I'm surprised you don't!  It is a wonderful cooking tool.

The chemicals that give the herbs/spices their flavor are mostly fat-soluble, so the butter will help drive them into the meat.  The pressure seal keeps the meat from drying out.  The lemon and wine add enough 'tang' to the sauce to keep the gravy from being too heavy.

To thicken the gravy my grandmother used flour, my mother used cornstarch, but I discovered tapioca powder on my own.

DesertRose

I think my mom has one, but I don't have a good place to put one.  (I have a teensy kitchen and a bunch of pots and pans and so forth.)

I might call her and ask if she still has hers.  :)
"If having a soul means being able to feel love, loyalty, and gratitude, then animals are better off than a lot of humans."

James Herriot (James Alfred "Alfie" Wight), when a human client asked him if animals have souls.  (I don't remember in which book the story originally appeared.)

Elkhound

Inspect the gasket VERY carefully, and replace if it is at all damaged.

Two books I'd recommend: PRESSURE COOKERS FOR DUMMIES and Lorna Sass' PRESSURE PERFECT.

DesertRose

"If having a soul means being able to feel love, loyalty, and gratitude, then animals are better off than a lot of humans."

James Herriot (James Alfred "Alfie" Wight), when a human client asked him if animals have souls.  (I don't remember in which book the story originally appeared.)