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The "Sacred King" concept in Lammas Night

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DesertRose:
So I have long loved this book; it's probably my favorite of KK's works outside the Deryni-verse.  I re-read it recently (snapped up the e-book edition when it was on sale in October), and then the winter holiday season came along and I was reminded of first two lines of the fifth verse of "We Three Kings," which is as follows:

"Glorious now behold Him arise,
King and God and sacrifice."

Gray speaks of Jesus being one of the possible examples of a sacred king sacrificed for the good of the land/the people several times in Lammas Night, and I wonder if this particular bit of Christmas-song-lyric was at least in the back of KK's mind when she wrote the novel.

Thoughts?

whitelaughter:

--- Quote from: DesertRose on December 18, 2018, 09:18:56 pm ---Thoughts?

--- End quote ---
Christian beliefs and legends had spread through the Pagan world for over a millennia before we have any records. While researching for my Arthurian game, I was constantly amused to cross the claim of Arthurian stories and heroes having been snurched from the Irish Fianna - despite the Irish heroes fighting the Fomorians, who seem to be Danish: and the Danes didn't hit Ireland for some 4 centuries after Arthur.

There's a similar situation with the Norse legends: the Eddas have a genealogy of the gods tracing back to Noah via the Trojans, and include a hymn of praise to the Christian trinity.

So I imagine that the Sacrificed King in Europe is simply a garbled version of the story of Jesus. Certainly the Fisher King in Arthur is; the names of the characters involved indicates a Greek basis to the legends.

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