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Author Topic: Medieval "Wine-braised Coney" recipe  (Read 8776 times)

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Offline Alkari

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Re: Medieval "Wine-braised Coney" recipe
« Reply #15 on: June 24, 2012, 05:06:32 pm »
Evie, if you want to do some proper feasts for those dolls ;)  you obviously need to save up for A Feast of Ice and Fire, the official Game of Thrones cookbook.   http://www.innatthecrossroads.com/a-feast-of-ice-and-fire/.   That site also has some really interesting free recipes to try.   

Never had goose, but I love duck.  Yes, it's got more fat than some meats, so it has to be properly cooked so as to render the fat down, and often crisp the skin.  The local Chinese place does yummy crispy duck.  :)

Kangaroo is also nice, and is a very healthy meat as it's extremely low in fat and high in iron.   It needs to be carefully cooked though because it's so lean, as it can dry out easily.  Which reminds me - I have a couple of fillets in my freezer, which will do for dinner sometime this week.   I've eaten rabbit, goat and venison once or twice, but haven't tried buffalo - that can wait until I get up to the Northern Territory.  I like buffalo milk cheese though.

Have tried crocodile (a bit bland, much like chicken), and frogs legs and snails.  The snails were rather neutral and slightly chewy - the butter and garlic sauce was yummy though!  And of course, I absolutely adore seafood of all sorts.   I also love kidneys, liver and brains - the only offal I won't eat is tripe.   In fact, tripe and okra are the only two foods I know that I positively won't eat. 



Offline Elkhound

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Re: Medieval "Wine-braised Coney" recipe
« Reply #16 on: June 24, 2012, 05:27:12 pm »
Kangaroo is also nice, and is a very healthy meat as it's extremely low in fat and high in iron.   It needs to be carefully cooked though because it's so lean, as it can dry out easily.  Which reminds me - I have a couple of fillets in my freezer, which will do for dinner sometime this week.   I've eaten rabbit, goat and venison once or twice, but haven't tried buffalo - that can wait until I get up to the Northern Territory.  I like buffalo milk cheese though.

If by 'buffalo' you mean Asian water buffalo, I can't say I have had that.  I have had American Bison, which is really almost just like very lean grass-fed beef; not different enough to be worth the expense.

I am told that some Australians of a certain age, when presented with kangaroo meat say, "We're eating SKIPPY??!!??"

Quote
Have tried crocodile (a bit bland, much like chicken), and frogs legs and snails.  The snails were rather neutral and slightly chewy - the butter and garlic sauce was yummy though!  And of course, I absolutely adore seafood of all sorts.   I also love kidneys, liver and brains - the only offal I won't eat is tripe.   In fact, tripe and okra are the only two foods I know that I positively won't eat. 
Snails are OK; the only ill effect is that if you eat too many you'll want to surrender to Germany.

I do like liver, brains, and sweetbreads.  I don't care for kidneys.  Tripe is OK if it is with other things, like a soup or stew.

De gustibus non est disputandum.


Offline Goscamber

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Re: Medieval "Wine-braised Coney" recipe
« Reply #17 on: January 15, 2015, 09:38:23 am »
Fun fact: a distant cousin invented craisins at Ocean Spray.
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Offline Goscamber

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Re: Medieval "Wine-braised Coney" recipe
« Reply #18 on: January 15, 2015, 09:44:59 am »
Quote
TWO TYPES

Two types of rabbit are available in American markets. The better-tasting (and the harder to find) is wild rabbit, which can be either hare or rabbit. (Americans ignore the genus differences between the two when it comes to food and call both rabbit.) Wild rabbit has sweet and firm meat, with a flavor reminiscent of pork and chicken. When young, it is suitable for grilling, sauteing or roasting, and when mature can be roasted or braised.

Domestic rabbit is milder in taste and quite pale compared to its wild counterpart. Its flavor is much like that of chicken, but its texture is much meatier. Unlike chicken, all of the meat on a domestic rabbit is white. Domestic rabbits do not have a great deal of surface fat and so must be barded or basted for roasting. They should be enriched with fat when braised or stewed.

You will find frozen domestic rabbit in most supermarkets. It will usually be skinned and gutted, with the head and paws removed. Wild rabbits are not always so prepared. It is wise, therefore, to specify to your butcher the degree of cleaning you want, to avoid receiving a rabbit closer to its natural state than you're prepared for.

Rabbit is traditional peasant fare and, though it is increasingly rare and expensive, it is unlikely that we will ever see it teamed with truffles and champagne.

FAMILIAR HERBS

Wild rabbit often will be cooked with the herbs on which it grazed during its life, such as thyme, rosemary, juniper, fennel and sage. In the fall and winter, it might be stewed with apples, pears, dried fruit, chestnuts or sauerkraut. The Spanish prepare a wonderful rabbit dish braised in an earthenware pot with wine, thyme, rosemary, walnuts, bay leaf and tiny Ligurian black olives. The French frequently baste it with mustard, and the British are fond of rabbit pie infused with salt pork and spiked with lemon rind. Southerners might barbecue their rabbit. In Pennsylvania, you'll likely come across a dish called hasenpfeffer, a tangy Pennsylvania Dutch specialty of marinated rabbit, simmered and sauced with sour cream and garnished with stewed prunes.
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Offline Goscamber

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« Last Edit: January 15, 2015, 10:01:08 am by Goscamber »
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